Archives for category: public performance

A preview of our lunchtime concert on Wednesday 7th June 2017 at the Emmanuel United Reformed Church on Trumpington Street, Cambridge UK. Mifune Tsuji (violin)
and I (piano) will be performing memorable tunes from the films and beyond. Please stop by if you’re in the vicinity! It’s a free entry with a retiring collection for the church.

 

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It’s unusual for me to share my practice session publicy and also to use a digital piano for it(!) but I thought some pianists/accompanists may find it useful.  Here it goes:

Pre-rehearsal stage
The main focus was to bring it up to the indicated tempo (138bpm) without loosing the intricacy of contrapuntal texture and the bouncy rhythmic nature of this piece.  What I found out through using drum beat patterns rather than a metronome was that it’s sharpened up my listening ear to be able to check how my 16th notes (semiquavers) are doing to greater details.  Truly useful exercise to go through before rehearsing with the clarinet players in a week’s time.  And it was fun too!

In the summer of 2013, my husband and I went to the finale concert of the Cambridge Summer Music Festival, held at the Long Barn on the ground of Childerley Hall. The performer was Kathryn Tickell and her new band “The Side” and it was their first ever concert. So, it was quite special. Although I didn’t know Kathryn Tickell, my husband, being a Geordie, did and told me about her and introduced me to her music. The whole experience at the concert was a very energetic, uplifting and moving one. Two tunes from the concert particularly stayed strongly in my mind, Yeavering and The Return. I remember I was captivated by hearing what inspired Kathryn to write these pieces. As we walked through the Childerley Hall ground to head home, I was humming this tune, and asked my husband ‘what’s the name of this song again that I’m humming now?’ – I’m very terrible with names; on first hearing, it usually doesn’t go in to my memory system, also true for the numbers… And he said, ‘The Return‘. I remember saying that this tune is so hauntingly beautiful, I’d like to arrange it for piano solo at some point. Well, it was three years ago and I finally managed to do something about it. It took me somewhat longer than I expected to complete it. Because as I explore where this tune took me, I find myself more and more going around in a circle… I had to stop for a while, then came back to it with a fresh approach.

According to Kathryn’s story, this tune was written “in anticipation of an eventual return of the Lindisfarne Gospels to the North England (for an exhibition).”

So, my main focus was to find a way of achieving a sense of long journey that the Lindisfarne Gospel took before it finally returned to where it was originated. And also to make a use of what piano can offer. By that, the obvious choices were to use wider ranges of pitches, various styles of accompanying bass part and to apply modulations to close and/or distant keys. After a meticulous editing over a long period, out came my piano solo version of The Return that I’m finally happy with. I’m now pleased to announce that my piano solo arrangement of The Return is ready to share in public after having managed to secure a permission from the Kathryn’s music publisher to arrange and publish it.

I write lots of piano solo arrangements, often by my students’ request, but sometimes I came across such music that prompts me to do so for my own pleasure and share with the public. Kathryn’s The Return was one of such. For this reason, I wanted to make it special, knowing that my husband being from the North, and it means something for me and him too. I’ve decide to create a music video. One visual artist came into my mind whom I worked with before once. I knew in my mind she’d understand what I was hoping to achieve. I’m very grateful for her visions and senses and I’m quite happy with the visuals that she created for this purpose. I hope you enjoy as much as we did in making it.  Finally, thank you Kathryn for giving us such beautiful music to share.


The sheet music is avalable from my web site.
The audio is available from my bandcamp page.

In addition to writing many teaching materials for my pupils, I often write many piano solo arrangements of known songs by their request.  But I sometimes come across music myself that I deeply fall in love with and haunt me around long enough to urge me to write an arrangement for it, so that I can play it on my piano.  One of which is Joni Michell’s A Case of you.

There are many musicians who cover this deeply moving song and I’m not surprised… I am one of them. I have three favourite versions of this song; Joni’s original, her 2000 jazz version with this mesmerizing arrangement by Vince Mendoza and Prince’s cover version. I was deeply moved by all three. I spent every minute of writing (and laborious editing!) this arrangement with an outpouring of affection towards this song. I hope you too enjoy playing this arrangement as much as I enjoyed arranging it. As always, thank you Joni for giving us many, many beautiful songs.

Here’s the demo recording of this arrangement. I’d like to record it again to create an video to put on YouTube some time in the future, just I did with Both Sides Now (https://yukiestpiano.wordpress.com/2012/11/15/368/), but hopefully a better one. Until then…

The sheet music for this arrangement is available from the Joni Mitchell’s official web site for free download.

In prior to the piano duet concert I’ll be performing with Marie-Noëlle Kendall, the local TV came to film us.  To be honest, I was horrified by the idea that I had to speak to the TV.   But at the hands of this man, Frankie Lowe, made this experience tolerable for me and managed to make me feel like I was speaking to a friend.  I’m ever so grateful for his efforts.  He was in charge of camera & lighting set-up, sound check, interview, filming, editing; basically everything.  How he managed to take bits and pieces out of our 1-hour interview and turn them into something coherent as a whole.  I say, that’s a talent and dedication.

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Broadcast on Cambridge TV, 23rd June on The M.A.C. (Music, Arts and Culture) programme as part of Cambridge News.

 

Our piano duet programme will be a good mixture of old time classics (Schubert’s Rondo in A & Fantasie in Fm & Schumann’s Bilder aus Osten) and something modern & exciting (Debussy’s Six épigraphes antiques & Gorb’s Yiddish Dances).  Performing at the church venue is always a challenge because of the boomy acoustics.  Pedalling and tempi will have to be discussed and subtly adjusted on the day at the venue.  Having said that, one of the pieces we can take advantage of the church acoustics will probably be the Debussy piece. Irony is that this piece has the least number of notes between us, but yet causes the more hand clashes if we’re not careful.  Overcoming this slight problem, the sonority of this particular piece will surely sound magical in the church setting – to me, it’s an ultimate soundscape.  We hope that we’ll be able to give something to the audience that they can take home.  I look forward to having you with us on the day!

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Piano Duet Concert (Marie-Noëlle Kendall & Yukie Smith)
Saturday, 9th July at 7.30pm
Trinity College Chapel, Cambridge UK

For the concert details: New Europe Society Events

It’s always a challenge for me to keep myself inspired during the period between when I start learning new pieces and when I’m ready to perform for the concert. Hence, selecting music in which I can maintain that focus is a very important process for me.

Last year, I came across with such music during a short conversation with a British composer, Graham Lynch. I’m very so glad that he guided me to his Beyond the River God. After a year or so, I’m still very much intrigued by this set of 5 short pieces originally written for harpsichord, offering memorable melodies encased in modal harmonies, seasoned with counterpoint and hemiloa at times, yet giving the performers such freedom to breathe between the notes. The more I got inside the music, the more I discovered its hidden charms.

The concert performance of the work was a success but I wasn’t perfectly happy with the audio result, so I decided to record the entire suite again, this time at home. I whole-heartedly enjoyed playing it, and hopefully will perform it again at the public venues in the future.  Thanks you, Graham for such beautiful music.

NES concert 10OCT15-small

Unusually, I’ll be performing a piano solo this time. Beyond the River God written by Graham Lynch for the harpsichordist Assi Karttunen, premiered last year in Finland.  As the composer states “Beyond the River God is the work that comes closest to having a dialogue with the French clavecinists of the 18th century, especially François Couperin”, it’s a very atmospheric suite, full of ethereal melodies with curious harmonies and rhythmic play.  It certainly tickles my intellectual curiosity.

The suite consists of 5 pieces:

I. Rondeau, with energy
II. Couplet 1, Pastoral
III. Rondeau 2
IV. Couplet 2
V. Rondeau 3

When I was given the written score by the composer, I smiled…  There’re no dynamic markings!  Just the general tempo and phrase markings.  It’s like I was given a beautiful drawing in which I get to colour the way I feel I’d like to.  I feel very priviledged to be given such freedom and it’s been such an experience that I’d certainly love to do again if the chance arises.

I look forward to performing this particular suite at the concert soon, for the first time on piano.

There’s a beautiful recording by Assi Karttunen on harpsichord, recently released.